Photo: Netflix

Here’s what’s happening in the world of television for Friday, October 26 and Saturday, October 27. All times are Eastern.

Top pick

Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina (Netflix, Friday): If you’re a fan of Archie Comics, if you watched the mid-’90s Sabrina The Teenage Witch TV series, or if you’re just looking for some wicked good fun, Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina promises to be an enchanting way to spend your evening. Spun by the comic’s original creator, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, Chilling Adventures follows the story of a young girl who comes of age… as a witch. As her 16th birthday (which, naturally, falls on Halloween) draws near, the half-witch, half-mortal, and aptly named Sabrina Spellman (Mad Men’s Kiernan Shipka) must choose between the witch world and the human world. Though its title hints at spooky adventures and witchy hijinks, the show is still a teen drama from the creators of Riverdale, so we can certainly expect to see Sabrina navigate not only her relationships with her (quite literally) hellish family, but also the more figurative hell that is high school. The series has already been picked up for a second season ahead of its release and, if our own Danette Chavez has anything to say about it, Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina will put a spell on you.

Regular coverage

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend (The CW, Friday, 9 p.m.)
Saturday Night Live (NBC, Saturday, 11:30 p.m.)
The Romanoffs (Amazon Video, Friday)

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Wild card

This Week At The Comedy Cellar (Comedy Central, Friday, 11 p.m.): From New York City’s most-esteemed comedy club comes this 30-minute collage of standup performances, roundtable discussion/improvised banter about the week’s news, and biographical spotlights. The show promises both topicality and intimacy by pulling a chair up to the Comedy Cellar’s famed “comics’ table,” where once you’ve got a seat, you’ll never lose it, even if you’ve abused its prestige and power as frequently and flagrantly as Louis CK. It’s a new lens through which to view the world of comedy, one that promises insights into both New York’s comedy scene and the comics’ creative processes.

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