Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.
Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.

Mondays just got a lot moodier with The Third Day and We Are Who We Are

Left: Jude Law stars in The Third Day (Photo Liam Daniel/HBO); Right: Jack Dylan Grazer stars in We Are Who We Are (Photo: Alessio Bolzoni/HBO)
Left: Jude Law stars in The Third Day (Photo Liam Daniel/HBO); Right: Jack Dylan Grazer stars in We Are Who We Are (Photo: Alessio Bolzoni/HBO)

Here’s what’s happening in the world of television for Monday, September 14. All times are Eastern.

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Top pick

The Third Day (HBO, 9 p.m.): Jude Law returns to HBO and the Monday primetime lineup in the chilling, if overly familiar, The Third Day. The limited series is split in two halves, each dubbed after a season: “Summer,” the three-episode arc that follows a grieving father (Law) who comes to discover just how menacing an English isle can be, even by day. As the intrepid Helen, Naomie Harris takes over in episodes four through six, which make up the show’s “Winter” season. In between, there will be a bonus live episode—titled “Autumn,” naturally—that will allow fans to indulge in their most convoluted theories. Monica Castillo will recap weekly.

We Are Who We Are (HBO, 10 p.m.): Luca Guadagnino makes his TV debut with We Are Who We Are, a coming-of-age drama starring Shazam!s Jack Dylan Grazer, Jordan Kristine Seamón, Scott “Kid Cudi” Mescudi, Chloë Sevigny, and Alice Braga. We Are Who We Are looks as full of the angst and ecstasy of adolescence as it does sun-dappled Italian vistas, so for the sake of allaying our FOMO, we’re prepared to revisit our teen years. Kayla Kumari Upadhyaya will recap weekly.

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Wild card

American Dad! (TBS, 10 p.m.): With its 300th episode of life with the Smith family—including the extraterrestrial Roger—American Dad! reaches a milestone that only two dozen scripted primetime series have hit. TBS touted this achievement with a Many Faces Of Roger Marathon that was decided by fans, but The A.V. Club’s Sam Barsanti also has some forthcoming thoughts on Roger’s breakout character status: “By focusing on Roger’s personas, the writers turned him into someone who is obsessed with stories—specifically the stories that he can create by pretending to be a completely different person—and that made American Dad!’s stories better as a whole. Roger can be anyone and do anything, which means individual episodes can also do anything, no matter how weird it may be (and it is often very weird).” Look for the rest of that feature on the site later this morning.

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American Dad!
American Dad!
Image: Courtesy of TBS

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