Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.
Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.

Here are two pals contemplating death in this exclusive clip from Evil’s season finale

Mike Colter, Katja Herbers
Mike Colter, Katja Herbers
Photo: Elizabeth Fisher (CBS)

Say the premise out loud, and it sounds a little silly: A forensic psychologist, a priest-in-training, and tech whiz/skeptic bop around New York City, investigating whether or not seemingly inexplicable phenomena are, in fact, explicable, on behalf of the Catholic church. But from its earliest moments onward, Evil has proven that it’s only ever as silly as it wants to be. A list of more apt descriptors would include words like thoughtful, upsetting, wild, fun, sexy, absurdist, and sad—or, as our own Erik Adams put it, “There hasn’t been anything this stylishly unsettling on network TV since Hannibal.” So here are two stylish people having an unsettling conversation about mortality, in this exclusive clip from tomorrow’s first-season finale, “Book 27.”

As the final moments of the season’s penultimate episode proved, Robert and Michelle King aren’t afraid to go a little bonkers with this freshman standout—we won’t give away the game for those who haven’t seen it, but know that a therapists’ office and the voice of Michael Cerveris are involved—but this scene is a nice reminder that it’s also a show that’s very much about people with opposing viewpoints having smart conversations about big questions. And that’s only fitting: As Robert King put it during the Television Critics Association press tour earlier this month, “[Evil] started with Michelle and I, who have very different backgrounds, arguing a lot over why the world seems like a creepier and stranger and darker place.”

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Evil’s first-season finale, “Book 27,” airs Thursday, January 30, at 10 p.m. Eastern on CBS. It has already been renewed for a second season.

Contributor, The A.V. Club and The Takeout. Allison loves TV, bourbon, and overanalyzing social interactions. Please buy her book, How TV Can Make You Smarter (Chronicle, 2020). It’s short!

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